Rubric for writing a narrative paragraph

Fair Topic is supported by general statements.

Imagined narrative rubric

In narrative writing we write about our own lives and thoughts and feelings, and so we write in the first person except where noted. Needs attention Writing does not use proper grammar or punctuation. Needs extra attention There is no topic sentence presented in the paragraph. Further study would show that we group our thoughts and hence words into blocks that we call sentences and paragraphs. But we should care, because a well-spoken or well-written paragraph adds detail, clarity, and beauty to even the most common thought. There is no minimum length for a paragraph. Needs extra attention There is no concluding statement at the end of the paragraph. There are no laws for writers, nor are there really any rules aside from what teachers or employers impose, but there is an audience out there, and if confuse them, you lose them. This rubric, if used wisely, is essentially a brief essay—and a damn good one if you give it the time and focus that well-crafted writing needs. Generally speaking, the more deep and complex the original thought, the longer a paragraph needs to be; however, if a writer is simply presenting the facts of a story as in the news the paragraphs are often remarkably brief—oftentimes just one or two sentences.

Read each section out loud or use text to speech and proofread carefully. Correct time order transition words or phrases are used.

Writing pathways narrative rubric

Minimal spelling errors. Think of your own family and use this rubric to write a one paragraph reflection on some aspect of your experience with your family that illustrates the theme of the power of your family in a single experience in your life. Topic Sentence Excellent The topic sentence is the first sentence in the paragraph. It is not a clear statement and does not repeat key words from the topic sentence. Fair The concluding statement is the last sentence of the paragraph. Example Prompt: The Power of Family No matter how a family is created, it is, for better or worse, the most universal theme and common thread that binds us all together as humans. There are no laws for writers, nor are there really any rules aside from what teachers or employers impose, but there is an audience out there, and if confuse them, you lose them. At the very least, if you try this formula, you will write a focused and logically structured paragraph; moreover, with a little bit more effort, you can write paragraphs that ring with beauty, clarity, and resonance! Interesting, concrete and descriptive examples and details with explanations that relate to the topic. Before you abandon this piece, let it sit for a couple of days, then go back to it with fresh eyes and a fresh mind and do what you need to do to make it more perfect—at least in your mind. Needs extra attention There is no concluding statement at the end of the paragraph. Sometimes we group a series of related paragraphs together into an essay, or a speech, or a story. Style Appropriate tone, distinctive voice; pleasing variety in sentence structure; Vivid diction, precise word choices. Good The topic sentence gives some clarity of the overall connectivity of the sentences present. In short, they might say that we communicate using a trinity of expression: a sentence is a thought fully expressed; a paragraph is a thought fully explained; while an essay or any longer writing piece is a thought fully explored.

But we should care, because a well-spoken or well-written paragraph adds detail, clarity, and beauty to even the most common thought.

Fair The concluding statement is the last sentence of the paragraph.

written narrative rubric

Concluding Statement Excellent The concluding statement is the last sentence of the paragraph. It is a somewhat clear statement that repeats some key words from the topic sentence.

Topic Sentence Excellent The topic sentence is the first sentence in the paragraph. Fair The topic sentence gives little evidence of a relevant topic connecting to the other sentences.

4 point narrative writing rubric

Time Order Excellent Paragraph has good organization, events are time ordered, sharp sense of beginning and end. Before you abandon this piece, let it sit for a couple of days, then go back to it with fresh eyes and a fresh mind and do what you need to do to make it more perfect—at least in your mind.

It is important to remember that a paragraph is always born in a single thought, and that paragraph ends with the original thought more fully developed and explained.

Narrative extension rubric

In the diagram you can see how the triangle starts small narrow and expands back towards a solid base. Needs extra attention There is a slight attempt at support. This rubric is designed to help writers organize the flow and focus of a personal experience narrative paragraph. Needs extra attention A story line is not evident. The original thought ends the same, yet different. Fair Paragraph has some organization, events jump around, start and end are unclear. Fair Topic is supported by general statements. In a way, a paragraph is like caterpillar that transforms into a butterfly. Insufficient, vague, or undeveloped examples. This rubric, if used wisely, is essentially a brief essay—and a damn good one if you give it the time and focus that well-crafted writing needs.

Examples and details relate to the topic and some explanation is included. In short, they might say that we communicate using a trinity of expression: a sentence is a thought fully expressed; a paragraph is a thought fully explained; while an essay or any longer writing piece is a thought fully explored.

autobiographical narrative rubric
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Narrative Essay rubric